Silk Road - Kyrgyzstan

KYRGYSTAN

There is a notebook page full of scenes, incidents and moment reminders to assist when there is a chance to sit and write this blurb. However, this incredible journey won’t stay still and around every bend, there is, even more, new sights and stories to try and describe. Take the optional drive for instance to view a couple of our Kyrgyzstan guides favourite places.

At our lakeside lunch stop, we looked over gin clear water to snow-capped mountain peaks while surrounded by apricot trees. Five minutes later we are maneuvering around red rocky outcrops with the dust settling on a treeless landscape. But, “there is gold in them thar hills”. The Canadians are mining it. Gold represents 30% of Kyrgyzstan’s GDP.

Earlier that morning Robin and Clare had followed the command of a roadside policeman to pull over. He was not happy that they had tints on the front windows and wanted them off immediately.
He also indicated that he would take Robin’s international licence for 4 days after which he would need to come and show them that this had occurred. Lucky for us we had Maksat, the guide with us who was able to suggest that he would personally see that the tints were removed as well as those on David and Vivien’s vehicle. A thank you of 1,000 Soms ($20) helped. While this was going on the rest of the convoy were parked up around the corner. The agricultural area had a few surprises. Wild marijuana is growing by the paddock full.

Everywhere there is evidence of the old days and ways sitting next to the new. The man riding a horse slowly along the furrows with another broad shouldered fellow manoeuvring the wooden plough. While later we have to almost stop in order to let a large, modern tractor towing a hay maker cross over the road from one paddock to the next.

A very young boy holding a stick with a metre of rope on the end keeps a cow from going on the road. The children provide such joyful moments as the vehicles weave their way around potholes that lie like discarded hoops and frisbees. Oncoming and overtaking locals scare the what’s it’s out of us. Overladen hay trucks teeter around dusty corners. Donkey and horse driven carts plod along the roadsides. Old European cars, maybe from the 70s, dart in and out of the convoy. We always let them in.

Yesterday, however, we had a good 3 hour run into Bishket on a new sealed highway. It took us through an incredible drive. Down a valley surrounded by high mountain peaks. These triangular stacks often had great stone walls at the bottom of them to keep rocks and snow slidesat bay. This is snow leopard country. They like it the high up to 4,000 metres. There are only about 200 snow leopards left.

Drama of the week. Nick, our young, creative camera guy. Crashed his drone. It was while he was filming high above the Charyn Canyon. The frustrating part was that we could see it sticking up on a bush which was on a rocky slope across a formidably flowing river. It was still sending film of the car park. The locals will try to retrieve it maybe on horseback at some point. In the mean time, Maksat has managed to use his know-how and find another drone for Nick.

And then there’s the delightful surprise boat ride on an enormous salt water lake where Nick takes a dive while the oldies envy his youth.

And on we go ……..